Do you want to know a bit more about circularity?

 
 

Do you want to know a bit more about circularity?

Sustainable Development

Sustainable development is the organizing principle for meeting human development goals while simultaneously sustaining the ability of natural systems to provide the natural resources and ecosystem services on which the economy and society depend.

2030 Sustainable Development Agenda

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership.

The Goals and targets want to stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet:
People

End poverty and hunger, in all their forms and dimensions, and to ensure that all human beings can fulfil their potential in dignity and equality and in a healthy environment.

Planet

Protect the planet from degradation sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change, so that it can support the needs of the present and future generations.

Prosperity

Ensure that all human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfilling lives and that economic, social and technological progress occurs in harmony with nature.

Peace

Foster peaceful, just and inclusive societies which are free from fear and violence. There can be no sustainable development without peace and no peace without sustainable development.

Partnership

Mobilize the means required to implement the Agenda through a revitalised Global Partnership, based on a spirit of strengthened global solidarity, focused on the poorest and most vulnerable's needs.

Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals seek to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve. They are integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental.

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals are defined in a list of 169 SDG Targets. Progress towards these Targets is agreed to be tracked by 232 unique Indicators.

Progresses shall be measured at a Global, Regional, National and Sub-national level on a voluntary basis under the Coordination of the High Level Political Forum (HLPF). The HLPF is the main United Nations platform on sustainable development.

Businesses and the SDGs


No matter how large or small, and regardless of their industry, all companies can contribute to the SDGs. Global challenges – ranging from climate, water and food crises, to poverty, conflict and inequality – are in need of solutions that the private sector should and must deliver. With supply chains spread across the globe and goods and materials being traded freely across continents, for each Company integrating the SDG’s in their business model, a large scale impact can be achieved.

Companies should take on the responsibility for how materials are sourced, how workers are treated, internally and by their suppliers, for the impact of their manufacturing processes and for the long term impact of their products on people and on the environment. The SDGs, as mentioned, are integrated and indivisible and it is not possible to achieve the Responsible production and consumption, Goal 12, without guaranteeing Decent Work and Economic Growth, Goal 8, or safeguarding Life on Land, Goal 15, or Life below Water, Goal 14.

The UN Global Compact provides 10 Principles that each company should integrate in order to pursue Corporate Sustainability.
Principle 1

Businesses should support and respect the protection of internationally proclaimed human rights

Principle 2

Make sure that they are not complicit in human rights abuses.

Principle 3

Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining.

Principle 4

The elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labour.

Principle 5

The effective abolition of child labour.

Principle 6

The elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation.

Principle 7

Businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges.

Principle 8

Undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility.

Principle 9

Encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies.

Principle 10

Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery.

Sustainable Development

Sustainable development is the organizing principle for meeting human development goals while simultaneously sustaining the ability of natural systems to provide the natural resources and ecosystem services on which the economy and society depend.

2030 Sustainable Development Agenda

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership.

The Goals and targets want to stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet:

People

End poverty and hunger, in all their forms and dimensions, and to ensure that all human beings can fulfil their potential in dignity and equality and in a healthy environment.

Planet

Protect the planet from degradation sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change, so that it can support the needs of the present and future generations.

Prosperity

Ensure that all human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfilling lives and that economic, social and technological progress occurs in harmony with nature.

Peace

Foster peaceful, just and inclusive societies which are free from fear and violence. There can be no sustainable development without peace and no peace without sustainable development.

Partnership

Mobilize the means required to implement the Agenda through a revitalised Global Partnership, based on a spirit of strengthened global solidarity, focused on the poorest and most vulnerable's needs.

Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals seek to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve. They are integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental.

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals are defined in a list of 169 SDG Targets. Progress towards these Targets is agreed to be tracked by 232 unique Indicators.

Progresses shall be measured at a Global, Regional, National, and Sub-national level on a voluntary basis under the Coordination of the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF). The HLPF is the main United Nations platform on sustainable development.

Businesses and the SDGs


No matter how large or small, and regardless of their industry, all companies can contribute to the SDGs. Global challenges – ranging from climate, water and food crises, to poverty, conflict and inequality – are in need of solutions that the private sector should and must deliver. With supply chains spread across the globe and goods and materials being traded freely across continents, for each Company integrating the SDG’s in their business model, a large scale impact can be achieved.

Companies should take on the responsibility for how materials are sourced, how workers are treated, internally and by their suppliers, for the impact of their manufacturing processes and for the long term impact of their products on people and on the environment. The SDGs, as mentioned, are integrated and indivisible and it is not possible to achieve the Responsible production and consumption, Goal 12, without guaranteeing Decent Work and Economic Growth, Goal 8, or safeguarding Life on Land, Goal 15, or Life below Water, Goal 14.

The UN Global Compact provides 10 Principles that each company should integrate in order to pursue Corporate Sustainability.

Principle 1

Businesses should support and respect the protection of internationally proclaimed human rights

Principle 2

Make sure that they are not complicit in human rights abuses.

Principle 3

Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining.

Principle 4

The elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labour.

Principle 5

The effective abolition of child labour.

Principle 6

The elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation.

Principle 7

Businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges.

Principle 8

Undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility.

Principle 9

Encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies.

Principle 10

Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery.

Circular Economy

The Circular Economy provides a clear and actionable framework, for businesses and consumers, to move away from an economic model that heavily relies on resources extraction and does not account for environmental degradation (the so-called externalities). To successfully implement a circular model, however, we need to go well beyond having a good recycling system. We need to rethink how we design products, move the focus from ownership to access and actively engage with consumers and make them active participants to the product’s value chain.

The Circular Economy is an economy that is restorative and regenerative by design.



In a circular economy, economic activity builds and rebuilds overall system health. The concept recognises the importance of the economy needing to work effectively at all scales – for big and small businesses, for organisations and individuals, globally and locally.
It is based on three principles:

  • DESIGN OUT WASTE AND POLLUTION

  • KEEP PRODUCTS AND MATERIALIS IN USE
  • REGENERATE NATURAL SYSTEMS
  • (source: EMF)



The Butterfly Diagram captures the essence of the Circular Economy.
The first thing to notice is the distinction of materials flow according to their nature: biological and technical.


BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS

on the left side of the diagram, are those materials that can safely re-enter the natural world, returning the embedded nutrients to the environment and allowing nature to provide a constant supply of resources and ecosystem services that sustain human life on the planet.

TECHNICAL MATHERIALS

on the right hand side, cannot re-enter the environment. These materials, such as metals, plastics, and synthetic chemicals, must continuously cycle, in closed loops, through the system so that their value can be captured and recaptured.


Following the two materials cycles, the Butterfly Diagram also makes a distinction between Consumerand User. In fact biological materials are the only ones that can be thought of as consumable, while technical materials are used.

It makes no sense to say that we consume our washing machines and cars in the same way that we consume food.

This is a subtle, but important distinction in how we view our relationship to material and how companies design their business models for the circular economy.



The Circular Economy Hierarchy diagram shows how it is possible to retain and add value within the technical cycle.
The higher a product stays in the hierarchy, the more value is retained.
Whereas the lower we go along the hierarchy the more external inputs (i.e. energy and materials) are needed.


REPAIR/MAINTAIN

Prolonging the lifespan of products can be achieved by designing products for durability as well as maintenance and repair. Long-lasting products can then be shared amongst users who are able to enjoy access to the service they provide, removing the need to create new products.


REUSE/REDISTRIBUTE

Technical products can be reused multiple times and redistributed to new users in their original form of with little enhancement or change. Second hand and vintage markets are proof of this already established approach.


REFURBISH

the process of repairing a product as much as possible or replacing a broken part without the need to disassemble the whole product (replacing the screen of a phone, or fixing car parts is a good example).


REMANUFACTURE

A product is remanufactured when it is disassembled to component level and rebuilt (replacing components where necessary) to as-new condition with the same warranty as a new product (this case happens often with electronics).


RECYCLE

Recycling is the process of reducing a product all the way back to its basic material level, thereby allowing those materials to be remade into new products.


Two elements that are key to enable such services are the Design and the implementation of Circular Business Models.

Circular Economy

The Circular Economy provides a clear and actionable framework, for businesses and consumers, to move away from an economic model that heavily relies on resources extraction and does not account for environmental degradation (the so-called externalities). To successfully implement a circular model, however, we need to go well beyond having a good recycling system. We need to rethink how we design products, move the focus from ownership to access and actively engage with consumers and make them active participants to the product’s value chain.


The Circular Economy is an economy that is restorative and regenerative by design.



In a circular economy, economic activity builds and rebuilds overall system health. The concept recognises the importance of the economy needing to work effectively at all scales – for big and small businesses, for organisations and individuals, globally and locally.
It is based on three principles:

  • DESIGN OUT WASTE AND POLLUTION

  • KEEP PRODUCTS AND MATERIALIS IN USE
  • REGENERATE NATURAL SYSTEMS
  • (source: EMF)



The Butterfly Diagram captures the essence of the Circular Economy.
The first thing to notice is the distinction of materials flow according to their nature: biological and technical.


BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS

on the left side of the diagram, are those materials that can safely re-enter the natural world, returning the embedded nutrients to the environment and allowing nature to provide a constant supply of resources and ecosystem services that sustain human life on the planet.

TECHNICAL MATHERIALS

on the right hand side, cannot re-enter the environment. These materials, such as metals, plastics, and synthetic chemicals, must continuously cycle, in closed loops, through the system so that their value can be captured and recaptured.


Following the two materials cycles, the Butterfly Diagram also makes a distinction between Consumerand User. In fact biological materials are the only ones that can be thought of as consumable, while technical materials are used.

It makes no sense to say that we consume our washing machines and cars in the same way that we consume food.

This is a subtle, but important distinction in how we view our relationship to material and how companies design their business models for the circular economy.



The Circular Economy Hierarchy diagram shows how it is possible to retain and add value within the technical cycle.
The higher a product stays in the hierarchy, the more value is retained.
Whereas the lower we go along the hierarchy the more external inputs (i.e. energy and materials) are needed.


REPAIR/MAINTAIN

Prolonging the lifespan of products can be achieved by designing products for durability as well as maintenance and repair. Long-lasting products can then be shared amongst users who are able to enjoy access to the service they provide, removing the need to create new products.


REUSE/REDISTRIBUTE

Technical products can be reused multiple times and redistributed to new users in their original form of with little enhancement or change. Second hand and vintage markets are proof of this already established approach.


REFURBISH

the process of repairing a product as much as possible or replacing a broken part without the need to disassemble the whole product (replacing the screen of a phone, or fixing car parts is a good example).


REMANUFACTURE

A product is remanufactured when it is disassembled to component level and rebuilt (replacing components where necessary) to as-new condition with the same warranty as a new product (this case happens often with electronics).


RECYCLE

Recycling is the process of reducing a product all the way back to its basic material level, thereby allowing those materials to be remade into new products.


Two elements that are key to enable such services are the Design and the implementation of Circular Business Models.

Start your journey with our Sustainable Guides


As today we are overwhelmed with information about what we should or shouldn’t do, but we are never told why. We want to begin our journey with the ‘why.’ Our guides we’ll walk you through the basic steps to take in order to embrace a more sustainable lifestyle and what impact could that have on your lifestyle and on the planet.

Individual Guides

Business Guides



Create an environmentally friendly living space that you love coming home to.
READ IT!

Enjoy eating food that is as safe and healthy for you as it is for the planet.
READ IT!

Unlock hidden potential by living in harmony with the world around you.
READ IT!

Get more from your travels, by making your next trip a more sustainable one.
READ IT!

Maximizes the well-being while minimizing inefficiencies and waste at work.
GET THE GUIDE

Discover the secrets of a circular product and how to close the loop of materials.
GET THE GUIDE

Get ahead of the competition
by leveraging on your green strategy.
GET THE GUIDE

Start your journey with our Sustainable Guides


As today we are overwhelmed with information about what we should or shouldn’t do, but we are never told why. We want to begin our journey with the ‘why.’ Our guides we’ll walk you through the basic steps to take in order to embrace a more sustainable lifestyle and what impact could that have on your lifestyle and on the planet.

Individual Guides


Create an environmentally friendly living space that you love coming home to.
READ IT!

Enjoy eating food that is as safe and healthy for you as it is for the planet.
READ IT!

Unlock hidden potential by living in harmony with the world around you.
READ IT!

Get more from your travels, by making your next trip a more sustainable one.
READ IT!

Business Guides


Maximizes the well-being while minimizing inefficiencies and waste at work.
GET THE GUIDE

Discover the secrets of a circular product and how to close the loop of materials.
GET THE GUIDE

Get ahead of the competition
by leveraging on your green strategy.
GET THE GUIDE

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